Collaborative Projects

Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts

QNS is currently collaborating with Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts on a project to train thirteen students in the skill of narrating. The students will learn to use audio recording software and equipment and develop microphone and voice technique skills specific to narrating. It is envisaged that these skills will compliment the students study program. Once the skills are accomplished and the necessary training completed the students will narrate a book written by an Indigenous author.

University of Queensland Press has very generously granted QNS copyright permission for a number of books written by Indigenous authors to be produced in audio format for the print disabled community. These audio books will then be promoted to public libraries around Australia.

The selected students have undergone the audition process and are currently in the initial stages of training at the QNS Studio.

Into the Future

QNS is currently working on establishing connections with Indigenous organisations and the broader community who may have a need, due to print disability, to access printed information in an audio format. As this aspect of our service is on demand volunteers would be engaged to transcribe the text into audio as and when the need arises. We hope that the links made with ACPA and the students would mean that QNS would be able to engage this group of volunteers as the need arises.

Sharing Australia’s Stories

Following on from the successful ‘Listen Up’ project, where two local people from the Wujal Wujal community were trained in the use audio recording equipment QNS collaborated on the ‘Sharing Australian Stories’ project assisting the Balkanu Cape York Development Corporation, the State Library of Queensland and the Wujal Wujal Community with the CD audio production of ‘Norman Baird – a spark within’ written by Kathleen Denigan. The audio CD accompanies the print copy of the book, which overcomes the literacy barriers. It is through the telling of stories such as Norman’s that the similarities between non-Indigenous and Indigenous communities, as much as the differences, can be highlighted, promoting the formation of an inclusive national identity.

Listen Up

In 2004 QNS embarked on a joint project with Indigenous Library Services (ILS) to enhance the collections of Indigenous Knowledge Centres (IKCs) in remote Queensland. The project aim was to work with remote Indigenous communities using resources available to Indigenous Library Services (ILS) and the skills of Queensland Narrating Service (QNS) to provide training to select, narrate, record, and make accessible through Indigenous Knowledge Centre (IKC), cultural stories, local history and other material of interest to Indigenous listeners.

The communities of Mabuiag Island in the Torres Strait and Wujal Wujal were chosen. ‘Listen Up’ Workshops were conducted in each community to train and skill Indigenous Knowledge Centre staff and volunteers in the techniques of narrating and recording relevant materials and to provide training in the use of recording equipment to increase the inclusiveness and self-determination of Indigenous people in remote Queensland. It was anticipated that elders may have a high level of interest and family/group/community stories will be favoured subjects.

The project strengthened the capacity of the two communities by building up the IKCs’ collection in consultation with community members about story and subject choice. The project also empowered people to actively participate in the selection and production of materials to be recorded in cassette and CD format then transferred into digital audio format for uploading to websites; thus making the audio accessible through IKC collections and in local and shared libraries. This promotes an interest in acquiring knowledge via the dual formats of print and audio materials.

Black Books

In 2000-2001 QNS received funding for the ‘Black Books’ Indigenous audio book narration project from the Brisbane City Council’s Cultural & Festival Grants Program. A selected number of published Indigenous novels were recorded by local Indigenous actors/narrators for access by readers with print disabilities through public library collections.