Australiana

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The Restorer

After a year apart, Maryanne returns to her husband, Roy, bringing their eight-year-old son Daniel and his teenage sister Freya with her. The family move from Sydney to Newcastle, where Roy has bought a derelict house on the coast. As Roy painstakingly patches the holes in the floorboards and plasters over cracks in the walls, Maryanne believes, for a while, that they can rebuild a life together. [click to continue…]

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Staying: A Memoir

As children, Jessie Cole and her brother Jake ran wild, free to roam their rainforest home as they pleased. They had each other, parents who adored them, and two mysterious, beautiful, clever half-sisters, Billie and Zoe, who came to visit every holidays. But when Jessie was on the cusp of adolescence, tragedy struck, and her happy, loving family fell apart.

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The Enigmatic Mr Deakin

This insightful and accessible new biography of Alfred Deakin, Australia’s second prime minister, shines fresh light on one of the nation’s most significant figures. It brings out from behind the image of a worthy, bearded father of federation the gifted, passionate and intriguing man whose contributions continue to shape the contours of Australian politics.

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West

West is an exquisite first novel set on the American frontier.

Addled by grief after the death of his wife, and prompted by reports of colossal animal bones found in Kentucky, John Cyrus Bellman sets off on his quest, leaving behind his only daughter, Bess, to be cared for by her aunt.

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My Ikaria

Three years ago, Spiri Tsintziras found herself mentally, physically and spiritually depleted. She was stretched thin – raising kids, running a household and managing a business. She ate too much in order to keep going and then slumped in front of the telly at night, exhausted, asking herself ‘What is it all for?’ [click to continue…]

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Losing It

In the 1980s in the Melbourne suburb of Fawkner, Josie’s father is drinking himself to an ugly and appalling death. Josie’s mother is a fac- tory machinist, bringing home piecework to keep the family afloat.

And Josie is surviving, or not – self-destructive sex, excessive alcohol, drugs, brutalised friendships.

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Jessie Williamson was a courageous missionary nurse who de- voted 35 years of her life to tribal people in the remote and dan- gerous highlands of West Papua. 

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Charles Kingsford Smith was the most commanding flyer of the golden age of aviation. In three short years, he broke records with his as- tounding and daring voyages: the first trans-Pacific flight from America to Australia, the first flight across the Tasman, the first non-stop cross- ing of the Australian mainland. He did it all with such courage, modesty and charm that Australia and the world fell in love with him. A ticker- tape parade was held in his honour on New York’s Fifth Avenue. At home, he became a national hero, ‘Our Smithy’.

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Between Us

Ana is an Iranian asylum seeker who is only allowed out of deten- tion to attend school. There she meets Jono, who is dealing with his own problems: his mum has walked out, his sister has gone away to uni and he’s been left alone with his Vietnamese father, Kenny.

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The Water Will Come

What if Atlantis wasn’t a myth, but an early precursor to a new age of great flooding? Across the globe, scientists and civilians alike are noticing rapidly rising sea levels, and higher and higher tides pushing more water directly into the places we live, from our most vibrant, historic cities to our last remaining traditional coastal villages. With each crack in the great ice sheets of the Arctic and Antarctica, and each tick upwards of Earth’s thermometer, we are moving closer to the brink of broad disaster.

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Chemistry

Our unnamed narrator is three years into her post-grad studies in chemistry and nearly as long into her relationship with her devoted boyfriend, who has just proposed. But while his path forward seems straight, hers is ‘like a gas particle moving around in space’: her research is stagnating, and she’s questioning whether she’s lost her […]

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Wilder Country

Finn, Kas and Willow have survived the winter of storms. Severe winds and cold have kept the Wilders at bay. Now that spring has come, everything has changed. They’re being hunted again, and they won’t be safe while Ramage wants their blood.

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Can You Hear The Sea?

Brenda Niall has turned her biographer’s eye to a personal subject – her grandmother, Aggie. She tells the story of a fiercely independent and intelligent woman who braved a new country as a single woman, teaching in a country school, before marrying a Riverina grazier, whose large powerful family was wary of the newcomer with […]

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Tinkering – The Complete Book of John Clarke

This book tells the story of John Clarke’s writing life, including the fan letter he sent to All Black Terry Lineen when he was ten, a golf instruction manual unlike any other, Anna Karenina in forty-three words, and the moving essays he wrote after the deaths of his parents. Tinkering is full of surprises, and […]

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A Week in the Life of Cassandra Aberline

After forty-five years in Sydney, Cassandra Aberline returns to her home town in the Western Australian wheat belt in the same way she left: on the Indian Pacific train.

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Bird Country

A boat trip in a squall to scatter the ashes of an old man, who was not loved. A young father, driving his daughters home across grass plains, unable to tell them that their mother has died. A speech that doesn’t include the aching pain of trying to save a cousin’s life.

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Rain Birds

Alan and Pina have lived contentedly in isolated – and insular – Boney Point for thirty years. Now they are dealing with Alan’s devastating early-onset Alzheimer’s diagnosis. As he is cast adrift in the depths of his own mind, Pina is left to face the consequences alone, until the arrival of a flock of black […]

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Thumbnail image for You Must Be Kitch Loughnan – a memoir

You Must Be Kitch Loughnan – a memoir

“I have had a charmed life! I have been electrocuted, thrown by bucking horses, had a snake in my pants, been horned out of the yards by wild cattle, caught in a windmill, bashed, machine-gunned, torpedoed and chased by an elephant.

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Sunlight and Seaweed

Acclaimed scientist Tim Flannery investigates exciting new technologies currently being developed to address our most pressing environmental threats in a book that presents a positive future for us and our planet. Climate change, food production and toxic pollution present huge challenges, but, as Flannery shows, we already have innovative, practical and inspiring solutions. Solar energy […]

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Thirty Days

One minute my wife was there. In a flash she was gone. In the ten months of Kerryn’s dying, I prepared myself for everything except for her death. Now that she is gone, I am desperate to know her as I never knew her. Thirty Days is a portrait of grief, of a marriage and […]

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