Aboriginal

Warning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are advised that audio books and recordings in this collection may contain images or sound recordings of people who are deceased.

Post image for Plains of Promise

Plains of Promise

In this brilliant debut novel, Alexis Wright evokes city and outback, deppening our understanding of human ambition and failure, and making the timeless heart and soul of this country pulsate on the page. Black and white cultures collide in a thousand ways as Aboriginal spirituality clashes with the complex brutality of colonisation at St Dominic’s Mission.

[click to continue…]

Up from the Mission charts the life and thought of Noel Pearson, from his early days as a native title lawyer to his position today as one of Australia’s most influential figures.

[click to continue…]

Post image for A Most Peculiar Act

A Most Peculiar Act

Set in a 1940s Darwin fringe camp, A Most Peculiar Act follows the exploits and adventures of sixteen-year-old Sugar and her resistance to the ludicrous policy of assimilation.

[click to continue…]

Post image for Eddie’s Country

Eddie’s Country

Eddie Murray died in suspicious circumstances in a police cell in the northern NSW town of Wee Waa in 1981. He was twenty-one years old.

[click to continue…]

Under the Mulga follows Jim Gasteen’s childhood adventures, marriage and his life-long love affair with the land, which saw him eventually become an unlikely champion of land management.

[click to continue…]

When Gracie, Daisy and Molly are taken from their mothers and sent away to a camp at Moore River, thousands of miles from their home country, they decide to escape.

[click to continue…]

Post image for Swallow the Air

Swallow the Air

When May’s mother dies suddenly, she and her brother Billy are taken in by Aunty. However, their loss leaves them both searching for their place in a world that doesn’t seem to want them. While Billy takes his own destructive path, May sets off to find her father and her Aboriginal identity. Her journey leads her from the Australian east coast to the far north, but it is the people she meets, not the destinations, that teach her what it is to belong.

[click to continue…]

Raparapa is the raw and gritty history of the Aboriginal drovers and stockmen of the Kimberley. The determination of Senior Nyikina lawman, John Watson, to present an Aboriginal perspective has produced personal stories that show how these hard-working men adapted to station life and why they became the backbone of the pastoral industry in northern Western Australia.

[click to continue…]

Post image for Finding Eliza

Finding Eliza

Aboriginal lawyer, writer and filmmaker Larissa Behrendt has long been fascinated by the story of Eliza Fraser, who was purportedly captured by the Butchulla people after she was shipwrecked on their island in 1836. In this deeply personal book, Behrendt uses Eliza’s tale as a starting point to interrogate how Aboriginal people – and indigenous people of other countries – have been portrayed in their colonisers’ stories.

[click to continue…]

Post image for Memoirs from the Corner Country

Memoirs from the Corner Country

Nanna was an imposing woman. She was large and dark, with strong arms and silver hair. Her scars bore testament to her adven- tures.

[click to continue…]

Thumbnail image for Forcibly Removed

Forcibly Removed

A first book from public figure, community worker and raconteur, Albert Holt. Forcibly Removed is a personal story told with humour and a confidence that comes from experience and achievement.

Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Not Just Black and White

Not Just Black and White

Lesley Williams was forced to leave the Cherbourg Aboriginal Settlement and her family at a young age to work as a domestic servant. Apart from pocket money, Lesley never saw her wages – they were kept ‘safe’ for her and for countless others just like her. She was taught not to question her life, until […]

Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Dark Emu

Dark Emu

Dark Emu argues for a reconsideration of the ‘hunter-gatherer’ tag for pre-colonial Aboriginal Australians and attempts to rebut the colonial myths that have worked to justify dispossession.

Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Nona & Me

Nona & Me

Rosie and Nona are sisters. Yapas. They are also best friends. It doesn’t matter that Rosie is white and Nona is Aboriginal: their family connections tie them together for life.

Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Plains of Promise

Plains of Promise

In this brilliant debut novel, Alexis Wright evokes city and outback, deepening our understanding of human ambition and failure, and making the timeless heart and soul of this country pulsate on the page. Black and white cultures collide in a thousand ways as aboriginal spirituality clashes with the complex brutality of colonisation at St. Dominic’s […]

Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Mazin Grace

Mazin Grace

Growing up on the Mission isn’t easy for clever Grace Oldman. When her classmates tease her for not having a father, she doesn’t know what to say. Papa Neddy says her dad is the Lord God in Heaven, but that doesn’t help when the Mission kids call her a bastard. As Grace slowly pieces together […]

Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Forcibly Removed

Forcibly Removed

A first book from public figure, community worker and raconteur, Albert Holt. Forcibly Removed is a personal story told with humour and a confidence that comes from experience and achievement.

Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Is That You Ruthie?

Is That You Ruthie?

“Is that you…? Matron ‘s voice would ring out across the dormitory, night or day. In that pause sixty little girls would stop in their tracks, waiting to hear who was in trouble. All too often it was Ruthie – Ruth Hegarty, the author and central character of this vivid and authentic account of the […]

Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for They liked me, the horses, straightaway

They liked me, the horses, straightaway

This day we were going to let the horses go. They’d been working for a while and it was their turn to have a spell. Old Alf Turner came down there watching the blokes tying their horses’ legs up. And he seen me get my horse and bring him up – just drop the reins […]

Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Talking About Celia, Community & Family Memories of Celia Smith

Talking About Celia, Community & Family Memories of Celia Smith

Talking About Celia…..is a montage of memories and pictures taking the reader inside an Aboriginal community and inside the life of an extraordinary Murri woman. People like Celia Smith are remembered through stories told and re-told by their family and community.

Read the full article →