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No Stone Unturned

When the author began this book it was to be a gift to her children to tell them of the richness of their heritage and the many things their ancestors had experienced. It also became a chronicle of Lebanon’s way of life, customs and ideas.

The author tells the story of her family through the experiences of her mother and father, her grandmother and grandfather, and the patriarch of the Brazilian branch of the family. They were adventurous people: born in Lebanon and emigrating, some to Brazil, some to the United States of America, and some to Australia.

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Merdeka and the Morning Star

West Papua is a secret story. On the western half of the island of New Guinea, hidden from the world, in a place occupied by the Indonesian military since 1963, continues a remarkable nonviolent struggle for national liberation. In Merdeka and the Morning Star, academic Jason MacLeod gives an insider’s view of the trajectory and dynamics of civil resistance in West Papua. Here, the indigenous population has staged protests, boycotts, strikes and other nonviolent actions against repressive rule.

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Draw Your Weapons

How to live in the face of so much suffering? What difference can one person make in this beautiful, imperfect, and imperilled world?’

In Draw Your Weapons, Sarah Sentilles offers an impassioned defence of life lived by peace and principle. Through a dazzling combination of memoir, history, reporting, visual culture, literature and theology, Sentilles tells the true stories of a conscientious objector during World War II and a former prison guard at Abu Ghraib. [click to continue…]

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The Water Will Come

What if Atlantis wasn’t a myth, but an early precursor to a new age of great flooding? Across the globe, scientists and civilians alike are noticing rapidly rising sea levels, and higher and higher tides pushing more water directly into the places we live, from our most vibrant, historic cities to our last remaining traditional coastal villages. With each crack in the great ice sheets of the Arctic and Antarctica, and each tick upwards of Earth’s thermometer, we are moving closer to the brink of broad disaster.

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Chemistry

Our unnamed narrator is three years into her post-grad studies in chemistry and nearly as long into her relationship with her devoted boyfriend, who has just proposed. But while his path forward seems straight, hers is ‘like a gas particle moving around in space’: her research is stagnating, and she’s questioning whether she’s lost her passion for her work altogether. [click to continue…]

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Wilder Country

Finn, Kas and Willow have survived the winter of storms. Severe winds and cold have kept the Wilders at bay. Now that spring has come, everything has changed. They’re being hunted again, and they won’t be safe while Ramage wants their blood.

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Can You Hear The Sea?

Brenda Niall has turned her biographer’s eye to a personal subject – her grandmother, Aggie. She tells the story of a fiercely independent and intelligent woman who braved a new country as a single woman, teaching in a country school, before marrying a Riverina grazier, whose large powerful family was wary of the newcomer with ideas of her own.
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Some Tests

It begins with the normally healthy Beth – aged-care worker, wife of David, mother of Lettie and Gem – feeling vaguely off-colour. A locum sends her to Dr Yi for some tests. ‘There are a few things here that aren’t quite right,’ says Dr Yi, ‘and sometimes it is these little wrongness’s that can lead us to the bigger wrongs that matter.’

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This book tells the story of John Clarke’s writing life, including the fan letter he sent to All Black Terry Lineen when he was ten, a golf instruction manual unlike any other, Anna Karenina in forty-three words, and the moving essays he wrote after the deaths of his parents.

Tinkering is full of surprises, and includes all kinds of puzzles and propositions.

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The Book of Dirt

They chose not to speak and now they are gone…What’s left to fill the silence is no longer theirs. This is my story, woven from the threads of rumour and legend.

Jakub Rand flees his village for Prague, only to find himself trapped by the Nazi occupation. Deported to the Theresienstadt concentration camp, he is forced to sort through Jewish books for a so-called Museum of the Extinct Race. Hidden among the rare texts is a tattered prayer book, hollow inside, containing a small pile of dirt.

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Thumbnail image for A Week in the Life of Cassandra Aberline

A Week in the Life of Cassandra Aberline

After forty-five years in Sydney, Cassandra Aberline returns to her home town in the Western Australian wheat belt in the same way she left: on the Indian Pacific train.

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The Stolen Bicycle

A writer embarks on an epic quest in search of his missing father’s stolen bicycle and soon finds himself caught up in the strangely intertwined stories of Lin Wang, the oldest elephant who ever lived, the soldiers who fought in the jungles of South-East Asia during the Second World War and the secret worlds of […]

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Bird Country

A boat trip in a squall to scatter the ashes of an old man, who was not loved. A young father, driving his daughters home across grass plains, unable to tell them that their mother has died. A speech that doesn’t include the aching pain of trying to save a cousin’s life.

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Night Swimming

Imagine being the only two seventeen-year-olds in a small town. That’s life for Kirby Arrow – named after the most dissenting judge in Australia’s history – and her best friend Clancy Lee, would-be musical star. Clancy wants nothing more than to leave town and head for the big smoke, but Kirby is worried: her family […]

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Anaesthesia

Until a hundred and seventy years ago many people chose death over the ordeal of surgery. Now hundreds of thousands undergo operations every day. Anaesthesia has made it possible. But how much do we really know about what happens to us on the operating table? Can we hear what’s going on around us? Is pain […]

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The Bright Hour

Nina Riggs was just thirty-eight when she was diagnosed with terminal cancer.

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Basket of Deplorables

Almost true stories for a post-truth world. A Manhattan party on election night. Liberal media types gather with big grins and high-end canapés to watch the Trump-Clinton results come in, expecting a smooth victory for Hillary.

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The Last Days of Ava Langdon

It has been twenty years since Ava Langdon published her much-lauded novel The Apple Pickers. Now, she leads a reclusive life in the Blue Mountains, with two rats and her typewriter as her companions.

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Scatter, Adapt, and Remember

Climate change. Pandemics. Catastrophic Volcanoes. Should we just give up and accept our doom? Absolutely not. Homo Sapiens will survive the next mass extinction.

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Marsh and Me

There’s a hill out the back of Joey’s house. Hardly anyone goes there—it’s not a beautiful place, just a covered-over old rubbish tip. But Joey likes it up there. It’s his hill—somewhere he likes to go to wonder about life. He longs to be the best at something, to be a famous astronaut, or mountain […]

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