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Sisters

In January 1966, Kate Howarth gave birth to a healthy baby boy at St Margaret’s Home for unwed mothers in Sydney. In the months before the birth, and the days after, she resisted intense pressure to give up her son for adoption, becoming one of the few women to ever leave the institution with her baby. She was only sixteen years old.

What inspired such courage? [click to continue…]

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My Ikaria

Three years ago, Spiri Tsintziras found herself mentally, physically and spiritually depleted. She was stretched thin – raising kids, running a household and managing a business. She ate too much in order to keep going and then slumped in front of the telly at night, exhausted, asking herself ‘What is it all for?’ [click to continue…]

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Losing It

In the 1980s in the Melbourne suburb of Fawkner, Josie’s father is drinking himself to an ugly and appalling death. Josie’s mother is a fac- tory machinist, bringing home piecework to keep the family afloat.

And Josie is surviving, or not – self-destructive sex, excessive alcohol, drugs, brutalised friendships.

[click to continue…]

Jessie Williamson was a courageous missionary nurse who de- voted 35 years of her life to tribal people in the remote and dan- gerous highlands of West Papua. 

[click to continue…]

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An Uncertain Grace

Some time in the near future, university lecturer Caspar receives a gift from a former student called Liv: a memory stick containing a virtual narrative. Hooked up to a virtual reality bodysuit, he becomes immersed in the experience of their past sexual relationship. But this time it is her experience. What was for him an erotic interlude, resonant with the thrill of seduction, was very different for her – and when he has lived it, he will understand how.

Later… [click to continue…]

Charles Kingsford Smith was the most commanding flyer of the golden age of aviation. In three short years, he broke records with his as- tounding and daring voyages: the first trans-Pacific flight from America to Australia, the first flight across the Tasman, the first non-stop cross- ing of the Australian mainland. He did it all with such courage, modesty and charm that Australia and the world fell in love with him. A ticker- tape parade was held in his honour on New York’s Fifth Avenue. At home, he became a national hero, ‘Our Smithy’.

[click to continue…]

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Sourdough

Offering insight into the life and experiences of the world’s oldest culture, this account of Australia’s Aboriginal history spans the mythologies of the Dreamtime through the modern-day problems within the community. Culture and history enthusiasts will get answers to such questions as: Where did the Aborigines come from and when? [click to continue…]

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The Fireflies of Autumn

San Ginese is a village where God lingers in people’s minds and many dream of California, Argentina or Australia. Some leave only to return feeling disheartened, wishing they had never come back, some never leave and forever wish they had. [click to continue…]

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A Curious Life

From the slums and religious indoctrination of northern England to front-line research institutions worldwide, stem cell pioneer Robert Tindle’s relentless curiosity led him to a remarkable career in fields as disparate as evolutionary biology and immunotherapy for cancer. [click to continue…]

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Between Us

Ana is an Iranian asylum seeker who is only allowed out of deten- tion to attend school. There she meets Jono, who is dealing with his own problems: his mum has walked out, his sister has gone away to uni and he’s been left alone with his Vietnamese father, Kenny.

[click to continue…]

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The Children’s Bach

Athena and Dexter live a happy but insular life, bound by routine and the care of their young sons. When Elizabeth, an old friend from Dexter’s university days, turns up with her much younger sis- ter, Vicki, and her lover, Philip, she brings an enticing world to their doorstep. 

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Simon Leys Navigator Between Worlds

Simon Leys is the pen-name of Pierre Ryckmans, who was born in Belgium and settled in Australia in 1970. He taught Chinese literature at the Australian National University and was Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Sydney from 1987 to 1993. He died in 2014.

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The Accident on the A35

The methodical but troubled Chief Inspector Georges Gorski visits the wife of a lawyer killed in a road accident, the accident on the A35. The case is unremarkable, the visit routine.

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No Stone Unturned

When the author began this book it was to be a gift to her children to tell them of the richness of their heritage and the many things their ancestors had experienced. It also became a chronicle of Lebanon’s way of life, customs and ideas. The author tells the story of her family through the […]

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Merdeka and the Morning Star

West Papua is a secret story. On the western half of the island of New Guinea, hidden from the world, in a place occupied by the Indonesian military since 1963, continues a remarkable nonviolent struggle for national liberation. In Merdeka and the Morning Star, academic Jason MacLeod gives an insider’s view of the trajectory and […]

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Draw Your Weapons

How to live in the face of so much suffering? What difference can one person make in this beautiful, imperfect, and imperilled world?’ In Draw Your Weapons, Sarah Sentilles offers an impassioned defence of life lived by peace and principle. Through a dazzling combination of memoir, history, reporting, visual culture, literature and theology, Sentilles tells […]

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The Water Will Come

What if Atlantis wasn’t a myth, but an early precursor to a new age of great flooding? Across the globe, scientists and civilians alike are noticing rapidly rising sea levels, and higher and higher tides pushing more water directly into the places we live, from our most vibrant, historic cities to our last remaining traditional […]

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Chemistry

Our unnamed narrator is three years into her post-grad studies in chemistry and nearly as long into her relationship with her devoted boyfriend, who has just proposed. But while his path forward seems straight, hers is ‘like a gas particle moving around in space’: her research is stagnating, and she’s questioning whether she’s lost her […]

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Wilder Country

Finn, Kas and Willow have survived the winter of storms. Severe winds and cold have kept the Wilders at bay. Now that spring has come, everything has changed. They’re being hunted again, and they won’t be safe while Ramage wants their blood.

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Can You Hear The Sea?

Brenda Niall has turned her biographer’s eye to a personal subject – her grandmother, Aggie. She tells the story of a fiercely independent and intelligent woman who braved a new country as a single woman, teaching in a country school, before marrying a Riverina grazier, whose large powerful family was wary of the newcomer with […]

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