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Queensland Narrating Service is one of a handful of non-profit organisations in Australia which produce audio material for people with print disabilities. Queensland Narrating Service acknowledges the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as the traditional custodians of the land in which we live and work. We pay respect to them and their elders, both past and present.

NDIS (National Disability Insurance Scheme)

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From the Bookjacket Radio Show

Annual Report for 2014 – 2015

Queensland Narrating Service Privacy Notice

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are warned  that this website may contain images and recordings of deceased people.

Institute for Healthy Communities. Australia Certification PTY LTDFunded by Queensland Government

QNS talks:

*Disability Services Minister Coralee O’ Rourke visited QNS. We discussed about the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and the Information Linkages and Capacity Building (ILC) and sat in on a training session with one of the students from ACPA.

*Reading Between the Lines – SBS Insight. Statistcs reveal that 44% of Australians have low levels of literacy.

*Naming your Files/Chapters. By using this as a guide for naming your files, it will keep them all in order.

Click to find more news on the newsletter for Winter 2016…

Click to find more newsletters… 

Here are some of the latest books added to the catalogue:
Post image for Mrs Whitlam

Marnie Clark of Curdie Vale can ride but she doesn’t have a horse. She dreams of owning one and having the whole world to ride it in. Before too long Marnie is gifted Mrs Margaret ‘Maggie’ Whitlam, a beautiful, big Clydesdale – bold, fearless and able to jump anything. Click to continue…

Post image for Searching for the Secret River

Kate Grenville’s novel The Secret River moved and exhilarated many people when it was first published in 2005. Readers marvelled at the subtlety of its language, and the power of Grenville’s story- telling. And they recognised that this simple tale of a poor convict family settling on the banks of the Hawkesbury River in the early nineteenth century represented a landmark moment in Australian fiction. Grenville had taken the novel to the frontier of European settlement and written a profoundly original and disturbing work about what happened there.

Click to continue…

Post image for Swallow the Air

When May’s mother dies suddenly, she and her brother Billy are taken in by Aunty. However, their loss leaves them both searching for their place in a world that doesn’t seem to want them. While Billy takes his own destructive path, May sets off to find her father and her Aboriginal identity. Her journey leads her from the Australian east coast to the far north, but it is the people she meets, not the destinations, that teach her what it is to belong.

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Post image for Unsung Hereos of the Queensland Wilderness

Many of these stories are told by the pioneers themselves, showing how they lived in the 1880s and 1890s. Their stories are true memories handed down to me when I was a lad over sixty years ago.

Click to continue…