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After 53 years of service to people in our community who have a print disability the Queensland Narrating Service will hang up its microphones and close its studio door at the end of June 2021.

Thank you all for your support over the years.

Please contact us by email only: qns@qns.net.au

Queensland Narrating Service is one of a handful of non-profit organisations in Australia which produce audio material for people with print disabilities. Queensland Narrating Service acknowledges the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as the traditional custodians of the land in which we live and work. We pay respect to them and their elders, both past and present.

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From the Bookjacket Radio Show

Annual Report for 2019

Queensland Narrating Service Privacy Notice

 

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are warned that this website may contain images and recordings of deceased people.

Funded by Queensland Government

QNS talks:

2019 was the United Nations Year of Indigenous Languages and Queensland Narrating Service collaborated on the Indigenous voices: Our Words, Our Stories Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages project with Logan City Council Libraries who received funding from State Library of Queensland and Telstra under the Deadly Digital communities funding. Over ten months participants explored a different Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander language culminating in the recording of 11 language stories, which offer a unique local insight into language, heritage and knowledge, captured at this moment in time by community members.Guided by Robert Ah Wing, project co-ordinator, and guest language speakers, community members were invited to share their language and knowledge through the spoken word. QNS provided digital recording equipment and training to Robert and Cheryl so that they could facilitate the recording and assist those who wished to record their stories. QNS also provided the post-recording sound production, editing and digital mastering of the audio files that have been made available as podcasts, with visual overlays, from the Logan Libraries website.

Our words, our stories podcast series recorded by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who live, work or perform in the City of Logan. Please follow the link to listen to the wonderful stories, captured at this moment in time.

Click here to listen to Our words, our stories

Queensland Narrating Service acknowledges that language heritage and knowledge always remains with the Traditional Owners, Elders, language custodians and other community members of the respective language Nation.

Here are some of the latest books added to the catalogue:
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Conceived while his larger-than-life father, Bear Bavinsky, cavorted around Rome in the 1950s, the young Pinch learns that his father’s genius trumps everything else. After Bear abandons his family, Pinch strives to make himself worthy—first as a painter, and then as his father’s biographer, before settling, disillusioned, into a job teaching Italian in London.

And when Bear dies, Pinch hatches a scheme to secure his father’s legacy.

What makes an artist? With his signature compassion and humour, Tom Rachman conjures a life lived in the shadow of greatness. The Italian Teacher is a masterly novel about a son striving to make his own mark on the world.

 

Audio excerpt for The Italian Teacher

 

Cat no: 4091
Post image for The Sunken Road

At the height of the Great Depression, with farmers walking off the land and the city’s creeks lined with kerosene-tin shanties, a young mother is taken by a shark in the shallows at Henley Beach. Her grieving husband flees north with his baby son to the town of Pandowie, far from the treacherous ocean. In time, the boy will have a daughter: the wilful auburn-haired Anna Tolley.

Nominated on its original 1996 release for the Man Booker Prize, The Sunken Road is Garry Disher’s proudest achievement. This moving, powerful novel set in the wheat and wool country of mid-north South Australia is at once the story of a region, a town and a people—and of one of the most memorable characters in Australian fiction.

 

Audio excerpt for The Sunken Road

 

Cat no: 4092
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Fortunes rise and fall. One day you have a lucky ticket and get a dinner so good and you eat so much that you think you’ll never need to eat again. You get busy making plans and then the hunger comes looking for you.I’m just an old man selling lucky tickets, but my theory is that we all get our turn in the end. I’ve had my turn at fortune. It was some years ago, maybe 2002, because I remember that was when Sài Gòn was less red and bright with fried chicken signs everywhere.

A highly original collection of stories by a talented young writer. In the comic-tragic eponymous story, ‘Lucky Ticket’, the narrator, a genial, disabled old man, whose spirit is far from crushed, sells lottery tickets on a street corner in bustling Saigon. In ‘Mekong Love’, two young people in a restrictive society try to find a way to consummate their relationship—in an extraordinary tropical landscape.

In ‘Abu Dhabi Gently’, a story of dreams and disappointment, of camaraderie and disillusionment, a migrant worker leaves Zanzibar to earn money in the UAE in order to be able to marry his fiancée. ‘White Washed’ depicts a strained friendship between two students in Melbourne, the Vietnamese narrator and a white girl. What does it mean to be Asian? What does it mean to be white? And what makes up identity?

In Lucky Ticket, Joey Bui introduces a diverse range of characters, all with distinctive voices, and makes us think differently about identity, mixed-race relationships, difficulties between family generations, war and dislocation.

 

Audio excerpt for Lucky Ticket

 

Cat no: 4083
Post image for Why We Can’t Sleep

When Ada Calhoun found herself in the throes of a midlife crisis, she thought that she had no right to complain. She was married with children and a good career. So why did she feel miserable? And why did it seem that the women around her were miserable, too?

Calhoun decided to find some answers. She looked into housing costs, HR trends, credit card debt averages and divorce data. At every turn, she saw a pattern: sandwiched between the Boomers and the Millennials, Gen X women were facing new problems as they entered middle age, problems that were largely overlooked. Speaking with women across America about their experiences as the generation raised to ‘have it all,’ Calhoun found that most were exhausted, terrified about money, under-employed, and overwhelmed. Instead of being heard, they were told instead to lean in, take ‘me-time’, or make a chore chart to get their lives and homes in order.

In Why We Can’t Sleep, Calhoun opens up the cultural and political contexts of this predicament and offers solutions for how to pull oneself out of the abyss—and keep the next generation of women from falling in. The result is reassuring, empowering and essential reading for all middle-aged women, and anyone who hopes to understand them.

 

Audio excerpt for Why We Cant Sleep

 

Cat no: 4080